CT Scan (CAT Scan)

CT Scan | CAT scan | CT Dental Scan | White Plains | YonkersComputed tomography (CT), or CAT scan, uses low doses of X-rays and sophisticated computer equipment to obtain high resolution cross sectional images of the body. CT scans are highly useful for examining injuries and abnormalities, and aiding in surgical preparation. CT scans can show different types of tissues, such as lung, bone, soft tissue, internal organs and blood vessels. Hartsdale Imaging is accredited by the American College of Radiology (ACR) to perform both pediatric and adult CT examinations. Utilizing our 16 slice Siemens Emotion scanner, we can provide patients with short exam times without compromising image quality.

What happens during a CT Scan?

Before the scan, the technologist will position you on a padded table, where you will be asked to remain motionless during the scan. When the exam begins, the table will move very slowly through the doughnut-shaped CT scanner. You will hear a faint buzzing sound as the images are being taken. The X-ray beam inside the CT unit spirals around you on all sides, creating 360-degree images or “slices” of the area being examined. As you move through the unit, many slices are captured. For some types of CT exams, you are asked to hold your breath and remain perfectly still for less than 15 seconds while the technologist takes the image. At any time during the CT examination, you may communicate with the technologist using an intercom. Once the CT examination is complete, the technologist will ask you to wait while the CT images are reviewed by the radiologist. Total exam time is between 15 and 30 minutes.

To enhance the visualization of the area to be scanned, different contrast materials are used. Depending upon the type of examination ordered, the contrast material may be administered orally or intravenously. Oral contrast comes in three flavors (banana, vanilla, and berry) and is mostly used for CT scans of the abdomen and pelvis. The day before your procedure you must pick up the oral contrast and follow the drinking instructions. Intravenous contrast is injected into your vein, and is used to enhance the appearance of organs and blood vessels. Hartsdale Imaging uses only non-ionic contrast, which has been shown to be safer and cause fewer side effects than ionic contrast material. Although serious side effects are quite rare, it is not uncommon to feel flushed or have a metallic taste in your mouth. These reactions usually last only a minute or two. If you are allergic to iodine or are taking medication containing Metformin, such as Glucophage, Fortamet, Glumetza, Riomet, Glucovance, Metaglip, ActoPlus Met or Avandamet, please tell the office when scheduling your appointment, as these medications can adversely react with the intravenous contrast.

Using a separate advanced computer workstation, Hartsdale Imaging is able to offer these advanced CT scan applications:

  • CT Angiography (CTA) - An accurate picture of blood flow through the vessels of the head, neck, chest, abdomen, pelvis and extremities.
  • 3-Dimensional Imaging - A clear 3-D view of bone structure, assessing degenerative or traumatic alterations.

CT Scan Preparation

There are minimal preparations for a CT scan:

  • Abdomen and pelvis with oral contrast only – nothing to eat or drink 4 hours prior to your exam time. Pick up oral contrast at least 1 day prior to exam date. Follow drinking instructions.
  • Abdomen and pelvis and any exam requiring an injection of intravenous contrast - nothing to eat or drink 4 hours prior to your exam time.
  • Head, neck, chest, spine, bone and joint examinations not requiring intravenous contrast - no preparation necessary.

CT Dental Scan (CAT Scan)

A CT Dental scan provides your dental surgeon with important information about your upper (maxilla) and lower (mandible) jaw to determine pre-surgically if a patient is a candidate for dental implants. High resolution 3-D computerized images allow your dental surgeon to take precise measurements of bone thickness and width, as well as the location of nerves and other structures the dental surgeon must be aware of prior to performing implant surgery.

What happens during a CT Dental Scan?

Before the scan, the technologist will position you on a padded table, where you will be asked to remain motionless during the scan. When the exam begins, the table will move very slowly through the doughnut-shaped CT scanner. You will hear a faint buzzing sound as the images are being taken. The X-ray beam inside the CT unit spirals around you on all sides, creating 360-degree images or “slices” of the area being examined. As your head moves through the unit, many slices are captured. At any time during the CT examination, you may communicate with the technologist using an intercom. Once the CT examination is complete, the technologist will ask you to wait while the CT images are reviewed by the radiologist. Total exam time is between 15 and 30 minutes.

CT Dental Scan Preparation

There are no preparations for a CT Dental scan.

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